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Reno, Nevada The Biggest Little City in the World By E. Andrew Martonyi 'The Fun Geography Guy', and Children's Geography Book Author I must admit that, while I have always been fascinated by history, especially of the Old West, I have never had the time to delve into it to the extent of actually visiting the sites where history was made. Now finding myself retired and having just moved to Nevada I have time to pursue some of these goals. And what better place to begin then with my new home state of Nevada. Nevada at 110,567 square miles is the 7th largest state in area of all 50 states. Its two largest cities are Las Vegas and Reno. What many people don’t realize is that Las Vegas and Reno are almost in the opposite parts of the state. Las Vegas in the southeast part of the state is 455 miles away from Reno in the northwest part of the state. Also while Las Vegas is located in the center of Vegas Valley, a desert region of about 600 square miles, Reno is located at the western border of Nevada. It lies in the high desert valley named the Truckee Meadows, about 20 miles east of the Sierra Nevada mountains and Lake Tahoe, the second largest alpine lake in the world.  Truckee Meadows gets its name from the Truckee River that makes its way through this relatively fertile valley, flowing east from Lake Tahoe and providing Reno with its sweet drinking water before making its way to Pyramid Lake approximately 30 miles to the north of Reno.
Reno, NV
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Reno’s history began when Charles William Fuller arrived in these meadows in 1859, and built a hotel and a toll bridge over the Truckee River to provide the necessary connection between Virginia City and the California Trail. With the discovery of silver at the Comstock Lode, thousands of miners would soon use this bridge, and a community grew up near it, primarily to service travelers. Four years later Fuller sold the bridge to Myron Lake, who added additional facilities and renamed it Lake’s Crossing. For the next five years Reno was known as Lake’s Crossing, and soon became the largest town in the county. By 1863, the Central Pacific Railroad had begun laying tracks east from Sacramento, and Lake deeded land to the railroad for its promise that they would build a depot at Lake’s Crossing. A new town was laid out and a mini- boom of building activity started immediately on the new site. The  railroad, which now claimed naming rights, named the site Reno in honor of General Jesse Lee Reno (1823-1862), a Union army officer killed during the Civil War. Although the moniker came years later “The Biggest Little City in the World” had been born.Puzzle Photo 'Reno Santa Crawl' courtesy of Reno-Sparks Convention & Visitors Authority, www.VisitRenoTahoe.com 
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Welcome to Schoolside Press
Reno, Nevada The Biggest Little City in the World By E. Andrew Martonyi 'The Fun Geography Guy', and Children's Geography Book Author I must admit that, while I have always been fascinated by history, especially of the Old West, I have never had the time to delve into it to the extent of actually visiting the sites where history was made. Now finding myself retired and having just moved to Nevada I have time to pursue some of these goals. And what better place to begin then with my new home state of Nevada. Nevada at 110,567 square miles is the 7th largest state in area of all 50 states. Its two largest cities are Las Vegas and Reno. What many people don’t realize is that Las Vegas and Reno are almost in the opposite parts of the state. Las Vegas in the southeast part of the state is 455 miles away from Reno in the northwest part of the state. Also while Las Vegas is located in the center of Vegas Valley, a desert region of about 600 square miles, Reno is located at the western border of Nevada. It lies in the high desert valley named the Truckee Meadows, about 20 miles east of the Sierra Nevada mountains and Lake Tahoe, the second largest alpine lake in the world.  Truckee Meadows gets its name from the Truckee River that makes its way through this relatively fertile valley, flowing east from Lake Tahoe and providing Reno with its sweet drinking water before making its way to Pyramid Lake approximately 30 miles to the north of Reno.
Reno
Reno’s history began when Charles William Fuller arrived in these meadows in 1859, and built a hotel and a toll bridge over the Truckee River to provide the necessary connection between Virginia City and the California Trail. With the discovery of silver at the Comstock Lode, thousands of miners would soon use this bridge, and a community grew up near it, primarily to service travelers. Four years later Fuller sold the bridge to Myron Lake, who added additional facilities and renamed it Lake’s Crossing. For the next five years Reno was known as Lake’s Crossing, and soon became the largest town in the county. By 1863, the Central Pacific Railroad had begun laying tracks east from Sacramento, and Lake deeded land to the railroad for its promise that they would build a depot at Lake’s Crossing. A new town was laid out and a mini- boom of building activity started immediately on the new site. The  railroad, which now claimed naming rights, named the site Reno in honor of General Jesse Lee Reno (1823-1862), a Union army officer killed during the Civil War. Although the moniker came years later “The Biggest Little City in the World” had been born.Puzzle Photo 'Reno Santa Crawl' courtesy of Reno-Sparks Convention & Visitors Authority, www.VisitRenoTahoe.com 
How to Make An Online Jigsaw Puzzle 1. Click on the Ghost Icon to make your workspace. 2. If the puzzle is already complete, click on the Work Icon and select scatter pieces. 3. Click and drag your pieces where you want them. 4. Mouse over a piece and use your mouse roller or your arrow keys to rotate the piece. 5. Click on Image to see the picture better.
Copyright 2011     Schoolside Press All Rights Reserved